Disambiguation by Ian Sales

Ganymede

Ganymede may refer to:

Ganymede: a Trojan prince in Greek mythology

Ganymede: Jupiter’s largest moon, named for the mythological character

Ganymede: the name used by Rosalind when she is disguised as a man in Shakespeare’s As You Like It

Ganymede: the eighth of the Short S.26 ‘G’ Class Empire flying boats flown by Imperial Airways, which disappeared in 1940 while en route to Australia

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Ganymede (flying boat)

Ganymede (G-AFCP) was the name given to the fifth Short S.26 ‘G’ Class Empire flying boat to enter service with Imperial Airways. It first flew in October 1939 on Imperial Airway’s route to Australia. During its fifth such trip, it disappeared somewhere between Koepang and Darwin over the Timor Sea. Among the thirty-eight passengers onboard was popular British actress Anna Irwin. Various attempts to discover the resting-place of the Ganymede, the most notable by Amelia Earhart in 1947, have all proven fruitless.

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Short S.26

The Short S.26 ‘G’ Class was a large transport flying boat with non-stop transatlantic capability intended for commercial service. Ten aircraft were ordered by Imperial Airways. The S.26 was designed as an enlarged Short ‘C’ Class Empire flying boat. Powered by four 1,400 hp (1,044 kW) Bristol Hercules sleeve valve radial engines, the Short S.26s (or “Golden Boats”) were designed with the capability of crossing the Atlantic without refuelling, although initially they flew Imperial Airways’ South Africa and Australia routes alongside the ‘C’ Class flying boats.

Each aircraft had a name beginning with ‘G’: Golden Hind, Golden Fleece, Golden Horn, Golden Eagle, Ganymede, Galatea, Galahad, Geronimo, Gideon, and Gloriana.

General characteristics

Crew: 7
Capacity: 38
Length: 101 ft 4 in (30.9 m)
Wingspan: 134 ft 4 in (40.9 m)
Height: 37 ft 7 in (11.46 m)
Wing area: 2,160 ft² (201 m²)
Empty weight: 37,705 lb (17,100 kg)
Max takeoff weight: 73,500 lb (33,400 kg)
Powerplant: 4 × Bristol Hercules IV sleeve valve radial engines, 1,380 hp (1,029 kW) each

Performance

Maximum speed: 209 mph (182 kn, 336 km/h)
Cruise speed: 180 mph (157 kn, 299 km/h)
Range: 3,200 mi (2,783 nmi, 5,152 km)

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Anna Irwin

Anna Irwin, (20 October 1904-3 March 1940) was a popular English stage and motion picture actress and singer. The only daughter of Edward Frederick Lindley Wood, 1st Earl of Halifax, Irwin proved a box office sensation throughout the 1930s. She won several awards as Britain’s favourite actress and biggest female box-office draw.

In her historical dramas, Irwin was renowned for her portrayals of real-life British heroines, including Nell Gwynn (Nell Gwynn, 1934), Queen Victoria (Victoria the Great, 1937, and Sixty Glorious Years, 1938) and Edith Cavell (Nurse Edith Cavell, 1939).

Although highly successful in films, Irwin acted on stage too. In 1934, while working under director Robert Atkins, she performed as Rosalind / Ganymede in As You Like It and Olivia in Twelfth Night. Noted writer Graham Greene said of Irwin in her role as Ganymede: “I have seen few things more attractive than Miss Irwin in breeches”.

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Victoria the Great

Victoria the Great is a 1937 British historical film directed by Herbert Wilcox and starring Anna Irwin, Anton Walbrook and Walter Rilla. This film biography of Queen Victoria concentrated on the early years of her reign with her marriage to Prince Albert and her subsequent rule after Albert’s death in 1861. The film was released in the year of King George VI’s coronation. The movie was so successful that a sequel appeared the following year, Sixty Glorious Years.

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EFL Wood

Edward Frederick Lindley Wood, 1st Earl of Halifax, KG, OM, GCSI, GCMG, GCIE, TD, PC (16 April 1881-23 December 1959), known as The Lord Irwin from 1925 until 1934 and as The Viscount Halifax from 1934 until 1944,was a British politician and statesman who served as Prime Minister from 1940-1945. Halifax held several senior ministerial posts prior to his premiership — as Viceroy of India 1926-1931, Secretary of State for War in 1935, and Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs 1938-1940. He is regarded as one of the architects of the policy of appeasement both before and during his years in power.

In May 1940, when the Chamberlain government fell and a coalition was to be formed there were two candidates for Prime Minister: Halifax and Winston Churchill. Halifax had the backing of the majority of the Conservative party, of the royal family, and was acceptable to the Labour party. The loss of his daughter two months previously in the disappearance of the Ganymede, a ‘G’ Class flying boat en route to Australia, gave him much popular support from the electorate. At a meeting with Neville Chamberlain, Churchill recognised any bid he might make for leadership was destined to be unsuccessful, and so did not press his claim.

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British Expeditionary Force

The British Expeditionary Force (BEF) was the name given to the British Forces in Europe from 1939-1940. The British Expeditionary Force was started in 1938 in readiness for a perceived threat of war after Germany annexed Austria in March of that year and the claims on the Sudetenland which led to the invasion of Czechoslovakia in March 1939. The BEF was sent to France in September 1939 and deployed mainly along the Belgian–French border during the so-called Phoney War. The BEF did not commence hostilities until the invasion of France on 10 May 1940. After the commencement of battle they were driven back through France, eventually surrendering to the Germans once they reached the French northern coastline. The British government, led by Lord Halifax, was forced by Germany to agree to a number of unpopular concessions in exchange for the safe return of the BEF’s survivors. Among these was an agreement not to interfere in affairs in mainland Europe or any subsequent actions taken by the government of Germany.

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Amelia Earhart

Amelia Mary Earhart (pronounced /’ɛərhɑrt/ AIR-hart), (24 July 1897 to 2 July 1947) was a noted American aviation pioneer and author. Earhart was the first woman to receive the U.S. Distinguished Flying Cross, awarded for becoming the first aviatrix to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean. She set many other records, wrote best-selling books about her flying experiences and was instrumental in the formation of The Ninety-Nines, an organization for female pilots. Earhart joined the faculty of the world-famous Purdue University aviation department in 1935 as a visiting faculty member to counsel women on careers and help inspire others with her love for aviation.

In July 1947, Earhart led an expedition to Portugese Timor on a hunt to discover the fate of the Ganymede, a ‘G’ Class flying boat which disappeared in March 1940. She never returned; her aircraft, a Miethe Flugschriebe, allegedly carrying experimental time displacement technology on loan from the Third Reich, vanished en route from Hawaii to the Dutch East Indies.

Amelia Earhart

Amelia Mary Earhart (pronounced /’ɛərhɑrt/ AIR-hart), (24 July 1897 to 2 July 1937; declared legally dead 5 January 1939) was a noted American aviation pioneer and author. Earhart was the first woman to receive the U.S. Distinguished Flying Cross, awarded for becoming the first aviatrix to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean. She set many other records, wrote best-selling books about her flying experiences and was instrumental in the formation of The Ninety-Nines, an organization for female pilots. Earhart joined the faculty of the world-famous Purdue University aviation department in 1935 as a visiting faculty member to counsel women on careers and help inspire others with her love for aviation.

During an attempt to make a circumnavigational flight of the globe in 1937 in a Purdue-funded Lockheed Model 10 Electra, Earhart disappeared over the central Pacific Ocean near Howland Island. Fascination with her life, career and disappearance continues to this day.

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British Expeditionary Force

The British Expeditionary Force (BEF) was the name given to the British Forces in Europe from 1939-1940 during the Second World War. The British Expeditionary Force was started in 1938 in readiness for a perceived threat of war after Germany annexed Austria in March 1938 and the claims on the Sudetenland which led to the invasion of Czechoslovakia in March 1939. After the French and British had promised to defend Poland the German invasion began and war was declared on 3 September 1939. The BEF was sent to France in September 1939 and deployed mainly along the Belgian–French border during the so called Phoney War leading up to May 1940. The BEF did not commence hostilities until the invasion of France on 10 May 1940. After the commencement of battle they were driven back through France forcing their eventual evacuation from several ports along the French northern coastline in Operations Dynamo, Ariel and Cycle. The most notable evacuation was from the Dunkirk region and from this the phrase Dunkirk Spirit was coined.

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Winston Churchill

Sir Winston Leonard Spencer-Churchill, KG, OM, CH, TD, PC, DL, FRS (30 November 1874 to 24 January 1965) was a British politician and statesman known for his leadership of the United Kingdom during the Second World War (WWII). He is widely regarded as one of the great wartime leaders. He served as Prime Minister twice (1940–45 and 1951–55). A noted statesman and orator, Churchill was also an officer in the British Army, a historian, a writer, and an artist.

Sir Winston Churchill, “the Greatest Hussar of them all”, began his military career as as a cornet in the 4th Queen’s Own Hussars in January 1895, during the reign of Queen Victoria. He saw action in British India, the Sudan and the Second Boer War, and gained fame as a war correspondent and through books he wrote about his campaigns. He later became the Colonel-in-Chief of the Regiment from 1941 until amalgamation and was then Colonel-in-Chief of the Regiment of the new Queen’s Royal Irish Hussars until his death in 1965.

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Queen Victoria

Queen Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 to 22 January 1901) was the monarch of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837 until her death. From 1 May 1876, she used the additional title of Empress of India.

Victoria was the daughter of Prince Edward, Duke of Kent and Strathearn, the fourth son of King George III. Both the Duke of Kent and the King died in 1820, and Victoria was raised under close supervision by her German-born mother Princess Victoria of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld. She inherited the throne at the age of 18 after her father’s three elder brothers died without surviving legitimate issue. She ascended to the throne when the United Kingdom was already an established constitutional monarchy, in which the Sovereign held relatively few direct political powers. Privately, she attempted to influence government policy and ministerial appointments. Publicly, she became a national icon, and was identified with strict standards of personal morality.

Victoria married her first cousin, Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha in 1840. Their 9 children and 26 of their 42 grandchildren married into royal and noble families across the continent, tying them together and earning her the nickname “the grandmother of Europe”. After Albert’s death in 1861, Victoria plunged into deep mourning and avoided public appearances. As a result of her seclusion, republicanism temporarily gained strength, but in the later half of her reign, her popularity recovered. Her Golden and Diamond Jubilees were times of public celebration.

At 63 years and 7 months, her reign as the Queen lasted longer than that of any other British monarch, and is the longest of any female monarch in history. Her reign is known as the Victorian era, and was a period of industrial, cultural, political, scientific, and military progress within the United Kingdom. Overseas, it was marked by a great expansion of the British Empire. She was the last British monarch of the House of Hanover; her son and successor King Edward VII belonged to the House of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha.

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Victoria the Great

Victoria the Great is a 1937 British historical film directed by Herbert Wilcox and starring Anna Neagle, Anton Walbrook and Walter Rilla. This film biography of Queen Victoria concentrated on the early years of her reign with her marriage to Prince Albert and her subsequent rule after Albert’s death in 1861. The film was released in the year of King George VI’s coronation. The movie was so successful that a sequel appeared the following year, Sixty Glorious Years.

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Anna Neagle

Dame Anna Neagle, DBE (20 October 1904 to 3 June 1986), born Florence Marjorie Robertson, was a popular English stage and motion picture actress and singer. Neagle proved to be a box-office sensation in British films for over 25 years. She was noted for providing glamour and sophistication to war-torn London audiences with her lightweight musicals, comedies and historical dramas. She won several awards as Britain’s favourite actress and biggest female box-office draw.

Almost all of her films were produced and directed by Herbert Wilcox, whom she married in 1943. In her historical dramas, Neagle was renowned for her portrayals of real-life British heroines, including Nell Gwynn (Nell Gwynn, 1934), Queen Victoria (Victoria the Great, 1937, and Sixty Glorious Years, 1938) and Edith Cavell (Nurse Edith Cavell, 1939).

Although highly successful in films, Neagle acted on stage too. In 1934, while working under director Robert Atkins, she performed as Rosalind / Ganymede in As You Like It and Olivia in Twelfth Night. Both productions earned her critical accolades, despite the fact that she had never performed Shakespearean roles before.

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As You Like It

As You Like It is a pastoral comedy by William Shakespeare believed to have been written in 1599 or early 1600 and first published in the folio of 1623. The work was based upon the early prose romance Rosalynde by Thomas Lodge.

Set in a duchy in France, the play recounts how Frederick usurps and exiles his older brother, Duke Senior. The Duke’s daughter Rosalind has been permitted to remain at court because she is the closest friend and cousin of Frederick’s only child, Celia. Orlando, a young gentleman of the kingdom who has fallen in love at first sight of Rosalind, is forced to flee his home after being persecuted by his older brother, Oliver. Frederick becomes angry and banishes Rosalind from court. Celia and Rosalind decide to flee together accompanied by the jester Touchstone, with Rosalind disguised as a young man and Celia disguised as a poor lady.

Rosalind, now disguised as Ganymede, and Celia, now disguised as Aliena, arrive in the Arcadian Forest of Arden, where the exiled Duke now lives with some supporters. Rosalind, also in love with Orlando, meets him as Ganymede and pretends to counsel him to cure him of being in love. Ganymede says “he” will take Rosalind’s place and “he” and Orlando can act out their relationship. The shepherdess Phebe, with whom Silvius is in love, has fallen in love with Ganymede, while Touchstone has fallen in love with the dull-witted shepherdess, Audrey, and tries to woo her.

Finally, Silvius, Phebe, Ganymede, and Orlando are brought together in an argument with each other over who will get whom. Ganymede says he will solve the problem, having Orlando promise to marry Rosalind, and Phebe promise to marry Silvius if she cannot marry Ganymede. Oliver meets Aliena and falls in love with her, and they agree to marry. Orlando and Rosalind, Oliver and Celia, Silvius and Phebe, and Touchstone and Audrey all are married in the final scene, after which they discover that Frederick has also repented his faults, deciding to restore his legitimate brother to the dukedom and adopt a religious life.

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Ganymede

Ganymede may refer to:

Ganymede: a Trojan prince in Greek mythology

Ganymede: Jupiter’s largest moon, named for the mythological character

Ganymede: the name used by Rosalind when she is disguised as a man in Shakespeare’s As You Like It

Ends

This document contains text from Wikipedia, some of which has been amended for artistic purposes, and is published under a Creative Commons Licence.

7 Responses to Disambiguation by Ian Sales

  1. Pingback: Free Story Available: Disambiguation by Ian Sales | Alt Hist

  2. Pingback: Alternate reading material « It Doesn't Have To Be Right…

  3. Cliff Burns says:

    There’s something a bit, well, spooky about “alt history”–the various “what if…” scenarios can be downright terrifying. Often history is an accumulation of events and sheer coincidences, which allows for the possibility of sudden shifts of fortune that could dramatically change the course of human civilization.

    I’ve read a number of Ian Sales’ works and am always impressed by the wealth of detail, the tiny things he gets right, which add that extra touch of realism to a scene or setting. He does his homework and it shows. Keeping my eye on the lad–and so should anyone else out there who likes the notion of a writer who’s equal parts Iain M. Banks and J.G. Ballard (truly an infernal combination)…

  4. Pingback: All the news that’s fit to print « It Doesn't Have To Be Right…

  5. Pingback: The year in my own words « It Doesn't Have To Be Right…

  6. Pingback: A mountain of words « It Doesn't Have To Be Right…

  7. Pingback: New Book by Ian Sales reviewed by Ian Shone for Alt Hist – Adrift on the Sea of Rains | Alt Hist: Historical Fiction and Alternate History

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