Sword and Scimitar by Simon Scarrow reviewed by Ian Shone

Sword and Scimitar Simon ScarrowGreat new review by Ian Shone. Simon Scarrow’s book Sword and Scimitar takes on the little known, but historically important, Siege of Malta in 1565. Take a look at Ian’s review to see if he does a good job of it.

Not a lot of activity recently on the blog for Alt Hist, but we will rectify that soon with some more book reviews and other news. Behind the scenes we have been working hard on the next issue of Alt Hist – more news to follow soon I hope.

Enhanced by Zemanta

New Book Review and New Book Reviewer – The Sins of the Father by C. B. Hanley

Sins of the FatherAs you may know Ian Shone writes quite a few of the book reviews for the Alt Hist site, and while he is still going strong (should have another review from him soon), we have also had some other volunteers step forward to write reviews as well. The latest of these is Christopher Yates. His review of The Sins of the Father by C. B. Hanley is now live on the Alt Hist website.

If you like tales of medieval intrigue and crime then it sounds like C. B. Hanley’s book might well be of interest to you. Please go and read Chris’s review to find out more!

Enhanced by Zemanta

New Book Review: Wake of the Bloody Angel by Alex Bledsoe

The latest book review from Ian Shone has now been posted in our reviews section. If you like a fair bit of hokum and pirates then Wake of the Bloody Angel by Alex Bledsoe might well be your cup of tea!

If you guiltily enjoy the likes of Ian Fleming or Robert E. Howard, then there is a good chance you’ll enjoy Wake of the Bloody Angel, and it’s the ideal book to give yourself a break if you have just finished reading something dry and heavy. Enjoyable nonsense, and nicely done.

Enhanced by Zemanta

New Book Review: The Far Side of the World by Daniel Kalla – reviewed by Ian Shone

the-far-side-of-the-skyA new book review from Ian Shone:

Coming off the last book reviewed for Alt Hist (Rebecca Cantrell’s A Game of Lies) there seems to be a certain accidental continuity with this book, which deals with a Jewish doctor’s flight from Vienna to Shanghai in the wake of the Anschluss. It’s another tense but sober story of life under the shadow of Nazism, tastefully and sincerely written, and it benefits from a similar consistency of pacing.

Read the rest of the review.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Interested in book reviewing?

If you read the Alt Hist blog regularly you will have noticed that we are publishing regular book reviews now from Ian Shone. However, so as not to overburden Ian too much, and to be able to review some more books (we’re getting quite a few sent through to us at the moment!) I would like to have a few more book reviewers for the site.

If you would be interested in volunteering to do this then please send me an email at althist.editor@gmail.com with some examples of previous book reviews, or a sample of a new book review that hasn’t been published anywhere. Also let me know what sort of books you would be interested in reviewing and how often.

We can’t offer actual payment, but you will get a free copy of the next issue of Alt Hist and also a credit in the issue.

Enhanced by Zemanta

New Book by Ian Sales reviewed by Ian Shone for Alt Hist – Adrift on the Sea of Rains

Adrift on the Sea of Rains by Ian SalesIan Shone has reviewed another new alternate history book for Alt Hist.

Ian’s latest review is of a new novel by Ian Sales called Adrift on the Sea of Rains. This novel is about the Cold War and astronauts – a combination of alternate history and hard science fiction.

Ian Shone’s review of Adrift on the Sea of Rains is in the Book Reviews section of our site.

Ian Sales has also written two stories for Alt Hist: ‘A Light in the Darkness’ and ‘Travelling by Air’, and we also have a free story on the site by him: ‘Disambiguation’.

Enhanced by Zemanta

By the Blood of Heroes reviewed by Ian Shone for Alt Hist

By The Blood of HeroesIan Shone has kindly volunteered his time to Alt Hist to help out with book reviews and proof-reading, and I’m glad to say that his review of By the Blood of Heroes by Joseph Nassise is is now available on the Alt Hist site under our Book Reviews section. By the Blood of Heroes is a combination of alternate history and zombie-fueled horror, and I think you will find Ian’s review interesting.

Please go along and take a look at the review.

Enhanced by Zemanta

I now have a Goodreads Author Profile

I’m partly blowing my own trumpet to announce that I have a Goodreads Author Profile, but also to let you know that all issues of Alt Hist are also on Goodreads, so if you use the site don’t forget to add them to your list of books and rate them!

Every bit of your support really helps, especially reviews and rankings on sites like Goodreads, and especially Amazon, so if you have read any of our issues then please post a quick review – it doesn’t matter if you didn’t buy it through Amazon you can still post a review there!

Many thanks.

Enhanced by Zemanta

“Hooray for Historical Fiction” says the Huffington Post!

Dave Astor at the Huffington Post wrote a very nice piece the other day about why historical fiction is just great – mostly because of its ability to educate. He specifically cites Stephen King’s new novel 11/22/63, and also mentions other books such as Walter Scott’s.

Although it’s great to hear historical fiction praised in such a way – and one just wishes that other genres such as Science Fiction and Fantasy would get such plaudits too on a more regular basis, but I think that Dave’s reasons for liking historical fiction also raise a number of questions.

  1. What’s the chances of people actually getting misinformation from works for fiction? For instance Stephen King’s book involves an alternate history scenario where someone travels back in time to prevent JFK’s death. I think in this case most people would know the real history and it would be obvious that the author is changing things, but in cases where history is less well understood the author has a real responsibility.
  2. How comprehensively should an author actually tell the reader (perhaps in footnotes or an introduction) about how their work diverges from recorded history?
  3. Should editors and publishers be more careful in what work they accept authors, and should they actually research the historical background themselves? For Alt Hist, I usually do check facts in the stories that I publish in the magazine for instance, and this actually takes up a large part of the copy-editing process.
  4. Are historical fiction authors the new history teachers?
Enhanced by Zemanta

Alt Hist to become a Biannual Publication

Alt Hist will be officially become a Biannual Publication. With the first two issues my aim was to see what was a reasonable publication schedule depending on my own available time and also the number of story submissions coming in. The first issue was published in October 2010 and the second issue was published in June 2011, and the third should be coming out in November 2011, so it looks like twice a year is about the right frequency for this publication.

So what does that mean for future publication dates? Well I think November and May are probably going to work out best. November – just before Christmas madness hits us, and May just before the Summer holidays.

As ever thank you for your support for Alt Hist, the new magazine of Historical Fiction and Alternate History.

More news on Issue 3 soon by the way!

Enhanced by Zemanta